Juncker unveils 315-bn-euro plan to 'kickstart' EU economy

The plan is the cornerstone of European Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker's five-year agenda to jumpstart the EU's moribund economyNew EU Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker unveiled Wednesday an eagerly awaited 315-billion-euro investment plan to "kickstart" the economy, saying it would show the world that Europe was back in business after years of crisis. Juncker said the proposal, which must be approved by European leaders at a summit in December, would mix an investment fund with a scheme to match new projects with private money. "Europe needs a kickstart and today the commission is providing the jump cable," Juncker told the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France.



In Britain, US turkey dinner is business

Seen through the window, Danny Lidgate places a turkey on display at his butchers shop in Holland Park in London, Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014. Lidgate, whose 160-year-old shop C. Lidgate, butcher and charcuterie, has been in the same family for five generations, says Americans just keep gobbling up the big broad-breasted heritage Bronze turkey. Put simply, business is very good indeed. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)LONDON (AP) — Big-breasted turkeys in butcher shop windows. Harvest displays of pumpkin and corn. Sandwich boards describing groaning feasts.



South African toddlers "swapped at birth" shouldn't be exchanged: court adviser

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - Two South African toddlers accidentally swapped on the day they were born should stay with the families who raised them and not be returned to their biological parents, a court-appointed expert said on Wednesday. The two children, a boy and a girl who are now aged four, were born on the same day in 2010 at a Johannesburg hospital but ended up being taken home and raised by the wrong parents after nurses mixed up their identities. ...
Activists raise Raqqa strikes death toll to 95

BEIRUT (AP) — Activists have raised the death toll from a series of Syrian government airstrikes on the Islamic State group's stronghold in northeastern Syria to at least 95.
Impoverished Lebanese city is target for IS group

In this Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014 photo, Lebanese men reconstruct their shop that was damaged due to clashes between the Lebanese army and Islamic militants in the northern port city of Tripoli, Lebanon. Last month’s clashes were considered the most serious because heavily-armed militants led the clashes; some were loyal to the Islamic State group and others to Syria's al-Qaida affiliate, the Nusra Front. Previous bouts were dominated by local Sunni Muslim tough men in the Tripoli slum of Bab Tabbaneh, fighting rivals in the nearby Jabal Mohsen, loyalists of the Syrian President Bashar Assad. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)TRIPOLI, Lebanon (AP) — Jamal Hayak is finally fixing up his restaurant, damaged a month ago in clashes between the army and militants in this northern Lebanese city. But he has little doubt violence will erupt again, and he says he fears next time it will be Islamic State group fighters battling in Tripoli's streets.





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